Photos from Cupertino Library Anniversary Celebration

I posted an album of these photos on Facebook, but for those of you who don’t “do” Facebook, here’s the best of the bunch. It was a great afternoon and I’m thankful to have been invited by the Cupertino Library Foundation and Library Commission.

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I decorated my booth with poems written by me and by winners of the Silicon Valley Reads contest (March 2014). I had magnetic poetry for folks to play with and my trusty golden poet laureate cup.

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I had some very special guests. Meeting the Cat in the Hat has always been a life long dream! Batman and I discussed poetry about bats. Former Cupertino Poet Laureate, David Denny, chatted up Darth Vader, who commented, that, although the Empire was not much of a poetical place, “I’ll have to think up some Imperial Haiku.”

I also had many community members drop by, play with the magnetic poetry, and create the own poems. Here is a sampling.

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I’m not sure why some of the poem photos are coming out sideways, but I guess that’s okay with poetry.  I also provided a game of “Exsquisite Corpse” and many people wrote lines. You can see the Imperial Storm Trooper above adding his. I’m working them all into a single poem, and will get that up here one of these days.

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It was a great day for the library and for poetry. I’m grateful (as always) to my supporters from the Library Foundation, the Library Commission and from the community. This time, especially to Bev Lenihan, Gayathri Kanth, and Adrian Kolb.

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One final shout out to my neighbor, Barbara Pollek, for making my fantastic Poet Laureate apron. It was the perfect gear for the day.

A Gate In Cupertino

There was so much going on yesterday at the Cupertino Library’s 10th Anniversary Fair! I will post a separate post with all my photos, observations, and special superhero sightings. Here is the poem I wrote for the occasion, slightly altered from the way I read it during the ceremony for the Teen Advisory Board’s time capsule internment. I was honored to be asked to read during that special event.

A Gate in Cupertino

In Cupertino, there is a rickety gate in a redwood fence.
It hides recycle bins and drying laundry.
Cats sit on the gate in the morning
waiting to be fed.

For dreamers in Ancient Greece,
there was a gate of ‘sawn ivory,’
and a gate of ‘polished horn.’
Penelope asked the old stranger
if her dreams of her wandering husband
were false or true.

High in the mountains of Hunan province,
there is a gate on the Yellow River
where a strong carp, who perseveres,
who swims with courage and leaps up,
becomes a dragon.

We live in a modern city
without stone walls, without iron fortifications.
The gates to our city are freeways and wide boulevards.
Here, there is a gateway to learning—
shining with glass and flanked by
trees of fire, the library gates are made of fountains.

Enter these gates today.
You don’t need a magic key.
Enter these gates today to dream,
enter to be transformed.
(c) Jennifer Swanton Brown
for the Cupertino Library 10th Anniversary
October 18, 2014

Notes on the poem

The theme for the Cupertino Library’s Anniversary was “Gateway to Learning.”  I spent some time researching famous gates in literature, and the symbology of gates in different cultures and dreams. I found gates mentioned prominently in Milton’s poem “L’Allegro” (1645) and in Book 19 of Homer’s epic poem, The Odyssey. I also discovered a lovely Chinese legend of the Dragon’s Gate, about carp that leap up through waterfalls high in Hunan province, on the Yellow River, and become dragons. There is a proverb that goes like this: 鲤鱼跳龙门. Learning all of this history and culture was great, but I needed an image to start the poem. I’d promised to write one for the anniversary and I was getting nervous. Sitting at my kitchen table Saturday morning, I spotted my cat, perched on the gate outside the kitchen door. Some gates are grand, some are humble. I had my poem.

Right against the Eastern gate,
Wher the great Sun begins his state,
Rob’d in flames, and Amber light,
The clouds in thousand Liveries dight.

Milton, L’Allegro (1645)

“Two gates there are for our evanescent dreams,
one is made of ivory, the other made or horn.
Those that pass through the ivory cleanly carved
are will-o’-the-wisps, their message bears no fruit.
The dreams that pass through the gates of polished horn
are fraught with trugh, for the dreamer who can see them.”

Homer, The Odyssey (19:630-640) Fagles trans.

April Fool’s Day Reading

It was my great pleasure to read with Stephanie Pressman and Amanda Williamsen last night at the first of this year’s “Unsung Holiday” poetry readings. Stephanie took the theme of foolin’ around very seriously with her jester-ly costume and thought provoking philosophically tricky poems. Amanda made us all laugh with memories of our unfortunate teenage years and bad kitchen smells. There were four open-mic readers, which was pretty good considering the miserably rainy night. Thanks again to Peet’s for their generosity and warm space, and to my poetry “posse” (Roz, Kathy and Adrian) from the Cupertino Library Foundation, the Friends of the Cupertino Library, and the Cupertino Library Commission. Special thanks to Dave Denny — without whom I’m sure I would still be standing there fussing with the audio equipment — for the photos.

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Poetry Contest Winners

Poetry Contest Winners

Read here about the winners of the poetry (and essay) contest sponsored by the Cupertino Library Foundation as part of 2014’s Silicon Valley Reads project. You can click on the names of the winners to read their work. We write some fine poems in Cupertino! Special thanks to Stephanie Pressman and Amanda Williamsen for helping me judge.

Adult Category

First Prize Winner: Kim Johnson

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Teen Category

First Prize Winner: Annabelle Tseng

Second Place: Angela Wang

Middle School Category

First Prize Winner: Hope Nguyen

Second Place: Jacqueline He

Here’s Amanda chatting with a couple of the winners after the event.

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And this is Amanda and I with Robin Sloan, the author of Mr. Penumbra’s 24-Hour Bookstore, one of the books featured during Silicon Valley Reads this year.

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Winners of Silicon Valley Reads poetry contest to be announced today

Winners of Silicon Valley Reads to be announced today

In addition to both authors returning to Silicon Valley to talk with De Anza College President Brian Murphy, the 1:30 p.m. program will include the announcement of the winners of the Cupertino Library Foundation’s essay and poetry contests. Forty-three adults and teens entered the essay contest, which was the most entries in the contest’s six years, and there were 50 entries for the first year of the poetry contest.

Join me there to greet the poetry contest winners.